This little Photomatic print is quite a gem. I found it in Raleigh, NC but according to what is written on the back, it was made at Rolling Green Park, an amusement park located between the towns of Selinsgrove and Sunbury, PA. The park is long gone but it offered different recreational activities, events, and performances. Some people even lived in cottages as permanent residents.

“Rolling Green Park - Defenders Auxiliary picnic [name]” B&W photograph. June 23, 1939. 3” x 2.5”.  Found in Raleigh, NC.

“Rolling Green Park - Defenders Auxiliary picnic [name]” B&W photograph. June 23, 1939. 3” x 2.5”.
Found in Raleigh, NC.

Machines like the one that produced this portrait were patented in 1925 by Russian immigrant, Anatol Josepho. In my opinion, the photobooth deserves more credit as a pivotal photographic innovation, as it brought the sitter and finished product closer together than ever before. Instead of handing over film to be processed, and picking it up days later, a photo could be had in minutes. Two decades later, however, the world was introduced to something even more remarkable: Polaroid instant film. Eventually, some photobooths started producing photos using instant film, sometimes with several exposures appearing on one Polaroid. Of course, as of today, photobooths generally utilize a digital process.

New York Times. Front page. March 28, 1927.    https://nyti.ms/2J7XTZJ

New York Times. Front page. March 28, 1927. https://nyti.ms/2J7XTZJ